Fused Suit, Full Canvas or Half Canvas?


 

When picking the right suit, you need to know the basic differences between a full canvas, half canvas and fused suit. While some may know a few of the basics when purchasing a suit, the majority might find it confusing when faced with the question to choose between the three different types of suit constructions. Picking the right suit is important as it helps tailor your appearance to what you are wishing to reflect and offers you the comfort you want.

 

What is a Canvas?

A suit is defined by its fit, quality of fabric, and construction. The construction of a suit is one of the main contributing factors for a superior fit, which is why it matters. To help you understand the difference and importance of different constructions we brought forward the main aspects to consider.

A canvas is a term most people do not hear very often. However, when you are having yourself made a custom-tailored suit, the term will definitely come up. The canvas is the interlining that is typically crafted using horsehair and blends of cotton or synthetic materials.

As it is an interlining, the canvas is placed in the middle of the suit fabric. The canvas is used as support and gives the suit its shape, much like our skeleton structure gives to our skin. This interlining is referred to as the canvas of the suit. The canvas will help the way your suit hangs and sits depending on the base you have chosen. 

A full canvas suit construction is the most luxurious option. The construction starts with an interlining that is sewn into the fabric making sure that when you move, the fabric will follow as well. It's extremely comfortable and there are no pressure points making the suit age beautifully. Over time, as you use the suit, this brilliant canvas allows the fabric to mould to your body gradually developing a flawless fit.

Fused

The final type of a suit jacket which does not have a canvas is known as a fused interlining. This is a mixture of various fabrics which are merged or laminated together by a warm and course treatment. This stiffens the fabric and is a faster and simpler way to make a suit. Because it requires less time to make, it will not provide the same quality as a real canvas and will generally be the least expensive option. The fused interlining cuts down on the movement and flexibility of the suit, making it less comfortable. Because it is completely fused, it also tends to be much warmer as it makes it much harder for air to flow through the jacket. 

It is important to keep in mind that with low quality fused fabrics, “bubbling” over time has been vastly improved. In previous times, there were problems with delimitation and “bubbling” would we observed over time. Now, with new methods and fusing processes, along with using contemporary components and technological innovation, these issues are primarily gone.  

 

Full Canvas

Traditional suits come with horsehair as they offer a slight stiffness and a spring texture, fighting away wrinkles, while offering you a crisp and clean look. The full canvas is the ideal choice for men who are looking for a well-constructed suit that ensures the perfect blend between quality and luxury. It will ensure that you get a suit that compliments your body type while being able to hold its own. A full canvas suit also offers durability, as it distributes the tension from different stress points of your shoulders, chest and hips. Due to the superiority of a full canvas suit, the cost will generally be higher. 

Half Canvas

A half-canvas suit gives you the best of both worlds. You get some luxury and quality of a full canvas suit while also the savings of a fused suit. A half-canvas suit construction is actually interlined with 2/3 of horse’s hair, located throughout the chest, stomach and lapel.Thiswill guarantee a good build for the top section of your suit instead of a firm and inactive build like many fused suits. The build on the upper portion of a suit will help compliment your shoulders and chest.

Because a half canvas construction requires half the amount of work to assemble, they are generally priced lower than a full canvas suit. While it may be lower in cost, the half-canvas suit will still offer the needed structure and luxury of a well fitted suit. Many customers actually prefer the lighter and less rigid build of a half canvas suit.